Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald

Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald Advertising is an advertising agency that has extensive ties to New Orleans business. They are said to have “literally helped write the book on brand development, marketing, advertising and public relations in the region,” [1] while focusing on New Orleans clients. The agency continuously passed through generations of the Killeen family, and, even after a series of mergers, has always kept New Orleans business first on its list of priorities.

History

Present day Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald traces its roots back to the Fitzgerald Advertising Agency. It was started in 1926 by Clifford L. Fitzgerald and Joseph L. Killeen and was originally called “Southern Advertising Agency,” however it changed its name when they realized an Atlanta advertising agency had the same name. [2] By 1931, the agency held an office in New York and in 1932, they acquired an office in Atlanta. [3] During the Great Depression, business boomed for Fitzgerald as people wanted creative advertising and Fitzgerald was ready to deliver. As people started earning more money, this desire for creativity only increased. [4] In 1931, the Fitzgerald Advertising Agency was elected to the American Association of Advertising Agencies. [5] This association serves as a check for both advertisers and the government, keeping fair and successful advertising possible. [6] During the 1930s, Joseph Killeen Sr., was honored with the Silver Medal lifetime achievement award by the Advertising Club of New Orleans. In 1932, Fitzgerald won first place in a national competition for art advertising. This was the first time an agency won that was not located in the Northeast. [7] By 1956, the agency was earning $10,000,000 in revenue. [8] In 1958, the agency expanded even more and opened a branch in Dallas. [9] In 1960, the agency lost one of their biggest clients and that marked a period of loss for the agency. By the 1990’s, business had picked back up. As of 2002, Fitzgerald merged with the Beuerman-Miller Group and became Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald. [10]

Clients

The Fitzgerald Advertising Agency boasts a long list of clients. They operated like many other large advertising agencies by focusing their attention on a few large clients which can be very successful, but also devastating if one of those clients is lost. Fitzgerald’s biggest client was Wesson Oil. They had Wesson Oil as a client from 1928 through 1960. They lost Wesson as a client in 1960 because they refused to relocate the agency to the West Coast. This loss started a long period of struggle for the agency. [11] The three other clients that they started out representing were Louisiana Power and Light Company, Pan-American Petroleum Corporation, and the National Pecan Marketing Association. To this day, Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald represents Tabasco which started in 1948, Zatarain’s Food, and ExxonMobil. [12] Two of the clients that they were most proud of were the 1984 World Fair in New Orleans and Pope John Paul II’s visit to New Orleans in 1987. [13]

Campaigns

Fitzgerald Advertising Agency participated in a number of campaigns, but they were business directed opposed to socially directed. In 1930, they issued an advertising campaign for New Orleans grocery merchants. William C. Fowler was quoted as saying, “The campaign will bring the customers into your stores. After that it is up to you. We will be able to send new customers into your stores. How you treat them, what their feeling of your service will be, is your problem. We can only go halfway with you.” The goal of the campaign was to raise the public’s opinion of the retail merchants of New Orleans. [14] Another campaign was financed by the Times-Picayune which was a study to “learn the true facts of the New Orleans Market.” Fitzgerald Agency studied the advertising market in New Orleans and discovered that the Times-Picayune was “the preferred paper of three times as much purchasing power as any other newspaper,” and “your advertisement has three times as much attention from able-to-buy families when it appears in New Orleans’ favorite newspaper.” Since the Times-Picayune financed the entire study, the results are not surprising. [15]

Ownership

The Fitzgerald Advertising Agency has an extensive history of ownership changes. It started in 1926 with Clifford L. Fitzgerald and Joseph Killeen. In 1938 Fitzgerald resigned and Joseph Killeen became president of the company. Keeping Fitzgerald’s name for the agency shows how much prestige it had already garnered. In 1934 the Atlanta office of Fitzgerald Advertising was taken over by Gottachaldt Humphrey. In 1961 Killeen steps down as president, and Robert Carley was elected. After Carley joined Young & Rubicam Inc., Roy Schwarz was named President. In July 1961 Fitzgerald associated with Knox Reeves Advertising which is based out of Minneapolis. It then became Knox Reeves-Fitzgerald Advertising and started a long period of national advertising by the company. By 1966 Fitzgerald was successful enough to buy its stock back. In 1968 Buzzy Killeen (Joseph Killeen Jr.) became president. Ron Thompson became president in the early 1990s and started turning the company around. Laura Lee Killeen was vice president at the time, and she is Joseph Killeen’s granddaughter. In 1997, Fitzgerald was acquired by Kupper Parker Communications and became Kupper Parker Fitzgerald. By 2002 they bought their stock back again to “reestablish domicile as a Louisiana corporation.” In 2002, they joined the Beuerman Miller Group, and became Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald. [16] They are currently located at 748 Camp St. and have a strong media connection to their building which was “home to the historic Cosimo Matassa’s recording studio where legends such as Ray Charles, Aaron Neville, Clarence “Frogman” Henry, Little Richard and Fats Domino recorded hit after hit.” [17]

Works Cited

  • BMF. http://www.bmf.com.au/base.htmlr
  • Killeen, Laura Lee (grand-daughter of Joseph Killeen. E-mail correspondence with Mary Laurel Castle. 26 April 2010.
  • “Fitzgerald Agency Honored by Council.” New Orleans: Times-Picayune. February 22, 1931.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • “Fitzgerald Agency Honored by Council.” 1993.
  • American Association of Advertising Agencies. http://aaaa.org.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • BMF. http://www.bmf.com.au/base.htmlr
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • “Merchants Plan Drive to Raise Local Standing.” New Orleans: Times-Picayune. May 20, 1930. p19.
  • “A Market: Where Sellers Come to Sell and Buyers Come to Buy.” Advertisement. New Orleans: Times-Picayune. September 28, 1932. p28.
  • Killeen. Correspondence.
  • BMF. http://www.bmf.com.au/base.htmlr

This page was last modified on 27 April 2012, at 01:38

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Beuerman, Miller & Fitzgerald Advertising

833 Howard Ave, New Orleans, LA 70113, USA

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Beuerman, Miller & Fitzgerald Advertising

1040 St Charles Ave, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA

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Beuerman, Miller & Fitzgerald Advertising

748 Camp St, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA