Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge

image description
Welcome Sign to Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge

Photo Credit: Dwyer, Denis. "Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana." Digital Image. Panoramio. March 20, 2012. http://www.panoramio.com/photo/68788225.

Bayou Sauvage is a National Wildlife Refuge located in eastern New Orleans. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System is to administer a national network of lands and waters for the conservation, management, and where appropriate, restoration of the fish, wildlife, and plant resources and their habitats within the United States for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.”

[1] With this mission in mind, more than 24,000 acres of marshes and forests within New Orleans city limits were acquired and established as Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge in 1990. [2]

Bayou Sauvage provides a habitat for numerous plants and animals, as well as recreational opportunities for locals and tourists. Within the refuge are a multitude of environments which foster around 340 different species of birds throughout the year.

[3]

Among these are endangered and threatened species such as the eastern brown pelican and the bald eagle. Additionally, the refuge provides a habitat where crustaceans, freshwater and saltwater fish can reproduce.

[4]

Volunteers plant marsh grasses in Bayou Sauvage.

[5]

Conservation is the underlying goal of the Bayou Sauvage Refuge, along with its parent organization the U.S. Fish & Wildlife service. Some of its conservation projects are supported by the local community, as with the 2013 project which airlifted thousands of Christmas trees to the refuge after the holidays to help build new marshes.

[6] The refuge’s marshland is also critical for birds throughout the year, as migratory birds pass through seasonally and waterfowl inhabit Bayou Sauvage year-round. [7]

The Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge’s Ridge Trail Boardwalk

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Some ways that visitors can engage with the refuge provide a degree of distance between visitor and nature, such as conservation and environmental education, hiking, wildlife observation, and photography. More engaged forms of interaction include boating, birding, fishing and hunting. [9] In recent years, the refuge has become a prime birding spot, with the levees and Recovery One landfill serving as vibrant bird habitats and prime viewing locations. [10] However, visitors should keep in mind the rules and regulations of the refuge, especially while hunting or fishing, as these activities require specific permits. [11] Despite the variety of activities available to visitors, perhaps the most popular way to engage with the refuge is on foot on the Ridge Trail: a path that highlights a cross-section of the marsh and forest habitats encompassed by the refuge. [12]

  • “About: Mission,” U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, last modified October 15, 2015, http://www.fws.gov/refuges/about/mission.html.
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge”, last modified April 20, 2015, http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/facts/bsucon.pdf.
  • “About the Refuge,” U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, last modified April 20, 2015, http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Bayou_Sauvage/about.html
  • U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, “Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan,” by Jack Bohannan, (Atlanta, Georgia, 2009).
  • National Wildlife Federation, “NWF volunteers work at Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge,” digital image, Flickr, May 28, 2011, accessed December 30, 2015, https://www.flickr.com/photos/nwfblogs/5786834557/in/album-72157626861952900/.
  • “Christmas Trees Dropped in Bayou Sauvage to Aid Wetland Restoration,” City of New Orleans Mayor’s Office, March 28, 2013, http://www.nola.gov/mayor/press-releases/2013/20130328-christmas-trees-dropped-in-bayou-sauvage/
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge.”
  • Jessica Reeder, “New Orleans’ Bayou Sauvage Post-Katrina,” digital image, Flickr, October 25, 2009, accessed December 30, 2015, https://www.flickr.com/photos/jessicareeder/4042266393.
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge.”
  • “Eastern New Orleans and Bayou Sauvage NWR,” Orleans Audubon Society, http://www.jjaudubon.net/easternno.
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge Hunting and Fishing Regulations 2015-2016,” August 2015, http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/BayouSauvageVirtualHuntBrochure.pdf (accessed December 30, 2015).
  • “Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge Ridge Trail Boardwalk,” OhRanger.com, last modified 2013, http://www.ohranger.com/bayou-sauvage-nwr/poi/ridge-trail-boardwalk.

This page was last modified on 30 November 2016, at 10:15

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Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge

61389 U.S. Highway 434, Lacombe, LA 70445