The Vieux Carre Courier

The Vieux CarreCourier was a newspaper founded in 1961 [1] to serve residents of the French Quarter. It focused both on social and society matter and issues that held much more importance for the neighborhood. At this time the uses of the Quarter were being debated, some residents were moving to other areas of the city and many historic homes and other buildings were threatened. [2] The business of tourism was also gaining momentum and this process is documented in The Courier. This newspaper was a forum in which the residents of the Quarter could have their voices heard on matters of preservation and other neighborhood issues during a time of turbulence and change in the Quarter and the city as a whole. The Courier helped both French Quarter residents, visitors, and other citizens of New Orleans realize the unique appeal of the historic area and also helped the Quarter to become the preserved tourism district that it is today.

The Paper

The Vieux Carre Courier, founded in November 1961, ceased publication in 1978. At the outset it was geared toward providing news and information to residents of the French Quarter, though later it shifted to more citywide appeal. Its circulation was 5,221 families in its first year of publication. The first issue cost 10 cents, or one could subscribe for five dollars a year. [3] In the early years, The Courier was around nine pages long and delivered by newspaper boy. [4] The paper was published in many various locations during its 17 year run. The first was 1010 Royal Street from 1961 to 1964, [5] the second 630 Toulouse Street from 1964 to 1965, [6] the third, 918 Royal Street from 1965 to 1968, [7] the fourth, 615 Dumaine Street from 1968 to 1970, [8] and the fifth, 1232 Decatur Street from 1970 to 1978. [9]

Columns and Articles

In the outset many of the articles and features in the The Vieux Carre Courier focused on the preservation of historic buildings in the French Quarter [10] and the everyday lives of the residents in this neighborhood. The goal of the newspaper was to lend importance to the French Quarter as a historic district as well as a neighborhood. Its slogan, “What’s New and To Do in these Fabled Environs” [11] showed the importance placed on the neighborhood itself. Early columns included, “Shopping Royal,” “Parlor and Patio,” and “Sunday at Church,” [12] these light columns spoke to the day-to-day life of Quarter residents. An article in the paper’s first issue stated the publication’s more serious goals. In discussing the paper’s editors and owners, it was written, “All are concerned, either by residence or sympathy, in our restoration progress and the many civic problems that beset this ancient Creole city within a thriving American metropolis.” [13]

Later Years and The End of The Courier

In the later years of the The Vieux Carre Courier, the format and reached changed to some extent. The stated audience was now the whole city of New Orleans and the content was less specific to the French Quarter, though that neighborhood was still thoroughly covered. [14] The newspaper became longer, the subscription cost was raised to eight dollars a year [15] and look was more colorful and modern. The newspaper also contained more controversial stories in this period. Features included, “Rape: When Fear Becomes Reality” [16] and “Sniper: A New Book Examines the Howard Johnson Killings.” [17] The end of the The Vieux Carre Courier came when the decision was made to merge with the Gris Gris, a newspaper that counted all of metropolitan New Orleans in its subscription range. Individuals who had subscribed to The Courier would now receive the Gris Gris, which was a similar paper in content, but had a wider geographical scope. [18] The Courier was a very important paper in New Orleans and French Quarter life and was an influence on the preservation that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s in the French Quarter. But, according to its last editor, Phillip D. Carter, who bought the paper in 1973, “it never made a cent.” [19] And so the difficult decision was made to shutter a newspaper with distinct old New Orleans leanings.

Works Cited

  • The Vieux Carre Courier. November 25 1961.
  • “Fine Old Creole Houses Suffering From Neglect”. November 25 The Vieux Carre Courier
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. November 25 1961.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. “These Are Your Carriers, Starting Out Last Friday to Deliver Courier to You”. December 2 1961
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. 1961-1964.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. 1964-1965.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. 1965-1968.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. 1968-1970
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. 1970-1978
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. November 25 1961.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. November 25 1961.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. November 25 1961.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. November 25 1961, 6.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. December 1977-May 1978.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier December 1977.
  • Caruso, Kathy. “Rape: When Fear Becomes Reality”. The Vieux Carre Courier. February 16 1978.
  • Landon, Les. The Vieux Carre Courier. “Sniper: A New Book Examines the Howard Johnson Killings”. February 16 1978.
  • The Vieux Carre Courier. May 11 1978
  • Carter, Phillip D. “Letter From the Editor”. The Vieux Carre Courier. May 18 1978.

This page was last modified on 04 May 2012, at 09:46

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The Vieux Carre Courier

1232 Decatur St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA

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The Vieux Carre Courier

630 Toulouse St, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA

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The Vieux Carre Courier

918 Royal St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA

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The Vieux Carre Courier

615 Dumaine St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA

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The Vieux Carre Courier

1010 Royal St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA